• Chlorella

A Freshwater Micro Alga

Chlorella is a freshwater microalgae

There are about thirty species of Chlorella in nature. Chlorella belongs to the family of freshwater microalgae that appeared on our planet about 2.5 billion years ago. It has survived through the ages, intact, thanks to its mode of reproduction and because it is remarkably balanced!

Algae are among the oldest organisms living on our planet. It is thanks to them that our atmosphere became breathable for the living beings that we are.

Microalgae are a natural and essential source of oxygen production:

6 CO2 + 6 H2O → C6H12O6 + 6 O2 ↑

The smallest algae or phytoplankton represent today a reserve and a resource of life essential to our planet. They alone produce 50% of our oxygen!

Chlorella vulgaris is a freshwater alga, a single-celled plant organism with a spherical shape the size of the red blood cells that make up our blood (about 5 µm).

Currently, algae and microalgae are captivating researchers in search of new sources of biofuel because the yield of photosynthesis in biomass for microalgae reaches 35% while that of higher plants is barely 6%!

The micro alga Chlorella is a deep green color due to its chlorophyll content (up to 4% of dry matter).

Micro-algae were already consumed by the Aztecs and the Incas who cultivated them to enrich their diet with precious plant protein compounds.

The interest of Chlorella was demonstrated almost by chance, following the studies carried out by the scientist Otto Warburg (Nobel Prize 1919) which aimed to study the relationship between the growth of Chlorella and its photosynthetic yield. Since then, Chlorella has been the subject of numerous studies that have resulted in a large number of scientific and medical publications. It is still a source of studies that should reveal some of its secrets.

Its composition makes it a food with excellent nutritional qualities. It contains about 50% protein and is rich in polyunsaturated fats, minerals, fiber, vitamins and chlorophyll.

No risk of overdosing has ever been mentioned.